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Governor promotes advanced placement law, and says special session may not be necessary

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Governor Scott Walker touring Mosinee Cold Storage cheese packaging operation.  Photo: Midwest Communications
Governor Scott Walker touring Mosinee Cold Storage cheese packaging operation. Photo: Midwest Communications

MOSINEE, Wis. (WSAU) -- A bill signed into law Friday makes it possible for 7th and 8th graders to earn high school credits. Governor Scott Walker signed Senate Bill 284 Friday at Badger Middle School in West Bend.

The Governor says leaders at Badger Middle School brought the issue to local legislators who the issue with him.  “Technically, the law didn’t allow them to get high school credit, and so the superintendent brought it to the attention of a couple of the local lawmakers. They came to us, passed the bill, and we said instead of signing it at the capitol, let’s sign it out at that school, not only for them, but our hope is that other schools across the state will take advantage of that.”

Walkers says it only makes sense to allow advanced placement and credits at both the high school and middle school levels.  "That opens the door for them to take more advanced placement courses, which allows them to go into a college with a four-year degree program, or go into a technical college with a two-year degree program. In either case, it allows them to get ready for their career or their next step for their needs to go into college sooner.”

Last week, Walker indicated he is willing to call a special session to deal with the voter ID law. The Governor says his top priorities remain tax relief through his Blueprint For Prosperity, and worker training programs. He would like Voter ID resolved, since it has been on the books for nearly three years. Walker says a special session might not be necessary.  “There are a couple of changes could be made that would make it more likely to be upheld, and so I said if need be, we’ll call a special session, but ideally, I think there’s legislation right now that has passed the Assembly that, if the Senate would take it up before April 1st in their normal session, they could pass it. (and) From what I’m told, legally, would be enough to keep the law intact going forward.”

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