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Sophia Loren to return to big screen in son's film

Italian actress Sophia Loren poses during a photo call for the movie "Cars 2 (3D)" in Rome in this June 15, 2011 file photo. REUTERS/Remo Ca
Italian actress Sophia Loren poses during a photo call for the movie "Cars 2 (3D)" in Rome in this June 15, 2011 file photo. REUTERS/Remo Ca

ROME (Reuters) - Italian actress and long-time Hollywood star Sophia Loren is set to return to the big screen in a short film directed by her son, which they are shooting in Naples this week.

Loren, 78, will star in her son Edoardo Ponti's adaptation of Jean Cocteau's one-person play "The Human Voice", which charts the breakdown of a woman who is left by her lover.

Wearing a cream suit and a polka dot scarf, Loren drew crowds of onlookers to watch her film scenes on the streets of Naples, the city she grew up in.

The French play has been translated into Italian, much of it in the Neapolitan dialect, according to media reports. Filming is set to last about a month and will take place in Rome and Naples.

Loren became established as an actress in Italy during the 1950s but a contract with the U.S. studio Paramount Pictures saw her catapulted to international stardom and perform opposite the likes of Clark Gable, Charlton Heston and Marlon Brando.

In 1962, she won an Academy Award for best actress for her role in Italian director Vittorio De Sica's "Two Women".

Loren last appeared on the big screen in the 2009 romantic musical "Nine" by U.S. director Rob Marshall, which also starred Penelope Cruz, Nicole Kidman and Daniel Day-Lewis.

In 2010 she appeared in Vittorio Sindoni's "My House is Full of Mirrors" an Italian television mini-series about the life of her mother Romilda Villani.

Cocteau's "The Human Voice" is best known in its 1959 opera adaptation by Francis Poulenc.

(Reporting by Catherine Hornby; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

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